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The Stream - Courthouse Libraries BC Blog

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Stay current with the latest news and views from Courthouse Libraries BC.  

  • John Bilawich: Beneficiary Designations - Part 5 of WESA Requires Changes To Estates Practice

    • Wills, Trusts and Estates

    A beneficiary designation is a simple, informal way to pass certain types of benefits to a beneficiary outside one’s estate. Part 5 of WESA expands the kinds of benefit plans that can be dealt with by beneficiary designation and introduces new rules about how designations operate. Lawyers, participants, executors, administrators, beneficiaries and others should all be aware of the implications of Part 5 of WESA and the increased level of care and vigilance the new provisions demand. Proper attention to the new provisions can have a significant impact on where plan benefits end up being paid.

    Full story

  • Tricky Legislation: The Adult Guardianship Act

    • Legal Research

    In theory, it should not be a momentous task to find out if an Act is in force, but sometimes it really is. If we resolve a particularly complicated piece of legislation, we know that there are others out there who may have similar questions. So we like to write a blog post about it so that someone else, faced with the same research, doesn't have to start from scratch.

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  • Legal information is going digital ... and the Library is too

    • About Us

    As so much of our world shifted to digital over the last two decades, law has been something of a hold out. When it comes to legal information, the “authoritativeness” of print has been slower to fade. Lawyers, as a profession, aren’t known for embracing new ways of doing things. But that’s now changing, rapidly. Technology is now transforming what it means to find and use legal information. The shift to digital has arrived.

    Full story

  • WESA reading roundup

    • Wills, Trusts and Estates

    With the March 31, 2014 coming into force date of the Wills, Estate and Succession Act, SBC 2009, c. 13 fast approaching, many practitioners are looking for quick ways to get up to speed. Here is a roundup of some tips and resources for current awareness:

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  • Glenn Veale: Formal settlement offer revoked by newer "informal" offer

    • Personal Injury

    As counsel, are you confident in knowing when an offer to settle is no longer on the table? What conduct by one or the other party will be enough to revoke it? Although Rule 9-1(8) of the British Columbia Supreme Court Civil Rules states that an offer to settle does not expire by reason that a counter offer is made, it does not specifically address the issue of revocation of a "formal" settlement offer when an "informal" settlement offer is made by the same party. When this occurs, is there a revocation of the original formal offer?

    Full story

  • Order Books to Your Home or Office with Book in a Box

    • About Us

    When it comes to legal information, Courthouse Libraries BC is committed to leveling the playing field in BC. We are piloting a new service that disperses our print collection across the province–even to communities that don’t have a convenient Courthouse Library location.

    Full story

  • BC Forms & Precedents and BC Practice by McLachlin & Taylor are now available on Quicklaw

    • Legal Research

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  • Social Media Evidence and Litigation (Part One)

    • Civil Litigation

    Courthouse Libraries BC maintains a regular column in the Advocate and in the first issue of 2014 we promised to follow up on the issue of technological competence and lawyering. Is it, for instance, even possible to opt out of a reasonable understanding of social media? Consider this in light of how commonplace social networks have become, and in the specifics set out in the definition of "competent lawyer" in the Code of Professional Conduct for BC.

    Full story

  • Essential Family, Criminal and Litigation Titles Now Available Province Wide Through Quicklaw

    One of our key goals is to shape our digital offerings and collections to meet the diverse needs in the legal communities we serve. With 29 locations throughout the province, it certainly is a challenge to provide all of the legal titles we would like to in each location. Many important legal texts are very expensive loose-leaf services that can have huge un-forecasted price fluctuations due to their pay-per-update pricing plan. Unfortunately it is simply too expensive to purchase print titles for all of our locations.

    Full story

  • Robert Holmes QC: When "must" means may and "may" means must

    • Civil Litigation

    Getting legal advice on how a statute, regulation or contract is likely to be interpreted by a court is usually a sound idea on any significant business decision. What may appear straightforward is not always as non-lawyers would expect. For example, in some cases, the word “may” is used. Usually, that would set out the something was permissible, not that it was required. But context and purpose govern and in some situations “may” can become “must”.

    Full story

  • Searching Federal Hansard

    • Legal Research

    Exciting news! The Library of Parliament, partnered with Canadiana.org, launched http://parl.canadiana.ca last Wednesday, November 20. The site provides access to scanned originals of the Federal Debates of Parliament from the 1st Parliament, 1st Session, 1867-1868, up to the 35th Parliament, 1st Session, 1994-1996, when coverage on the Parliament of Canada site begins. Between parl.canadiana.ca and parl.gc.ca, the Debates of the House of Commons and Senate are now fully available online.

    Full story

  • How Can I Find Out if a Federal Statute Has Been Amended?

    • Legal Research

    Full story

  • Volunteer Recognition

    • About Us

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  • Legal Research Hack: Google Scholar Shortcuts

    • Legal Research

    Full story

  • Chat Reference Pilot Project

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  • Updated Yet Again: What Happened to the Insurance Act, RSBC 1996?

    • Legal Research

    Full story

  • Tom Wallwork: Best practices for relocating guardians under the Family Law Act

    • Family Law

    The Family Law Act says that a joint guardian of a child must give all other guardians at least 60 days' notice in writing before moving with their children. The only real exceptions to this rule are if: The other guardian(s) are likely to become abusive or violent as a result of giving notice; or The other guardian(s) don't really have a relationship with that child.

    Full story

  • Top 5 must-knows about the new CanLII

    • Technology

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  • Five Ways to Use the New CanLII More Efficiently

    • Technology

    Full story

  • Rose Keith: Rule 7-6 medical examinations within Rule 11-6 limits, keeping fresh evidence out less than 84 days before trial

    • Personal Injury

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